A photograph of the Crow two-spirit Osh-Tisch (on the left), also named Finds-Them-And-Kills-Them, also called Woman Jim, with a woman who is probably the one named in the story, The-Other-Magpie.
Excerpt from an interview with Pretty Shield, who tells the story of the battle of the Rosebud, 1876.
"Did the men ever tell you anything about a woman who fought with Three-Stars on the Rosebud?"
"No", I replied, wondering.
"Ahh, they do not like to tell of it, "she chuckled. "But I will tell you about it. We Crows all know about it. I shall not be stealing anything from the men by telling the truth.
"Yes, a Crow woman fought with Three-Stars on the Rosebud, two of them did for that matter; but one of them was neither a man or a woman. She looked like a man, and yet she wore women’s clothing; and she had the heart of a woman. Besides, she did a woman’s work. Her name was Finds-Them-And-Kills-Them. She was not a man, and yet not a woman," Pretty Shield repeated. "She was not as strong as a man, and yet she was wiser than a woman," she said musingly, her voice scarcely audible.
"The other woman," she went on, "was a wild one who had no man of her own. She was both brave and bad, this one. Her name was The-Other-Magpie, and she was pretty.
"Both these women expected death that day. Finds-Them-And-Kills-Them, afraid to have the Lacota [sic] find her dead with woman-clothing on her, changed them to a man’s before fighting commenced, so that if killed the Lacota would not laugh at her, lying there with a woman’s clothing on her. She did not want the Lacota to believe that she was a Crow man hiding in a woman’s dress, you see.
"The return of the Crow wolves [warriors] and these two women to our village was one of the finest sights I have ever seen…I felt proud of the two women, even of the wild one (The-Other-Magpie), because she was brave. And I saw that they were the ones taking care of Bull-Snake, the wounded one, when they rode in."
Ahhh, there was great rejoicing.”
-Changing Ones: Third and Fourth Genders in Native North America (Will Roscoe)

A photograph of the Crow two-spirit Osh-Tisch (on the left), also named Finds-Them-And-Kills-Them, also called Woman Jim, with a woman who is probably the one named in the story, The-Other-Magpie.

Excerpt from an interview with Pretty Shield, who tells the story of the battle of the Rosebud, 1876.

"Did the men ever tell you anything about a woman who fought with Three-Stars on the Rosebud?"

"No", I replied, wondering.

"Ahh, they do not like to tell of it, "she chuckled. "But I will tell you about it. We Crows all know about it. I shall not be stealing anything from the men by telling the truth.

"Yes, a Crow woman fought with Three-Stars on the Rosebud, two of them did for that matter; but one of them was neither a man or a woman. She looked like a man, and yet she wore women’s clothing; and she had the heart of a woman. Besides, she did a woman’s work. Her name was Finds-Them-And-Kills-Them. She was not a man, and yet not a woman," Pretty Shield repeated. "She was not as strong as a man, and yet she was wiser than a woman," she said musingly, her voice scarcely audible.

"The other woman," she went on, "was a wild one who had no man of her own. She was both brave and bad, this one. Her name was The-Other-Magpie, and she was pretty.

"Both these women expected death that day. Finds-Them-And-Kills-Them, afraid to have the Lacota [sic] find her dead with woman-clothing on her, changed them to a man’s before fighting commenced, so that if killed the Lacota would not laugh at her, lying there with a woman’s clothing on her. She did not want the Lacota to believe that she was a Crow man hiding in a woman’s dress, you see.

"The return of the Crow wolves [warriors] and these two women to our village was one of the finest sights I have ever seen…I felt proud of the two women, even of the wild one (The-Other-Magpie), because she was brave. And I saw that they were the ones taking care of Bull-Snake, the wounded one, when they rode in."

Ahhh, there was great rejoicing.”

-Changing Ones: Third and Fourth Genders in Native North America (Will Roscoe)