New York Magazine Deems Naturally Curly A Bad Investment For No Reason
Kevin Roose, over at New York Magazine, decided to launch a column called “Dumb Money: Exposing Silicon Valley’s Stupidest Investments.” He writes:

But Silicon Valley, like any other industry, has its share of truly dumb ideas. For every start-up that changes the world and makes its founders rich, a thousand die quick, anonymous deaths.
Some of tech’s clunkers never get off the ground, but others manage to get big, high-profile investments despite having no redeeming qualities whatsoever. (For example, what kind of genius decided to throw $1.2 million at NaturallyCurly, the “leading social network and community for people with wavy, curly and kinky hair?”)

Roose provides no actual evidence as to why NaturallyCurly is a bad investment. He doesn’t cite a thing – not their traffic numbers, no advertising sales, and no discussion of the exponential growth in the market they offer. But why should he? NaturallyCurly doesn’t fit the pattern – and Roose’s casual dismal underscores exactly why minorities, women of color in particular, have such a hard time breaking into the consciousness of the tech world.
In the comments, a few people went out of the way to correct Roose’s assumptions:

RACHELSKLAR “What kind of genius decided to throw $1.2 million at NaturallyCurly, the ‘leading social network and community for people with wavy, curly and kinky hair?’” This kind: John Paul Dejoria, founder of John Paul Mitchell Systems (that’s a hair-care company) and Patron Tequila (you *may* have heard of it). Probably he saw a wildly underserved market being targeted by a company that grew steadily and organically thanks to the vision of the founding team. But why do research when you can just breezily make a call based on zero knowledge? This would be a great column if it were based on serious analysis. The casual throwaway diss on Naturally Curly is…not.


JOANIEPETERSON @RachelSklar – Agreed. Now I know there’s not a lot of overlap between NYMag and black girls (hi bananarama), but NaturallyCurly is tapping into a HUGE market. I mean, even ya’ll white folks saw “Good Hair” right?
And, unlike companies like Carol’s Daughter that are now trying to “pivot” to gain market share beyond those with African ancestry, NaturallyCurly started out with a pan-ethnic outlook. Pretty smart: they get to keep the majority-black readership yet face little risk of being accused of “selling out” as they grow.

And the CEO of TextureMedia, Crista Bailey, noted that the market is huge (60% of the world has textured hair and 80 million women in the US alone have textured hair), that their base is strong (two million unique visitors every month) and puts the spending power of the Naturally Curly community (close to a half billion each year). A million dollar investment is about 50 cents per user.
In addition, Roose wouldn’t have had to look far to see why natural and textured hair care is a booming market. In my comment, I noted how looking at the revenues of leading natural hair companies like Ouidad (estimated $10 Million annually) and Carol’s Daughter ($35 million annually) would show that considering the fairly small investment, it made total sense. That level of investment was less than what some companies pay for their advertising campaigns.

New York Magazine Deems Naturally Curly A Bad Investment For No Reason

Kevin Roose, over at New York Magazine, decided to launch a column called “Dumb Money: Exposing Silicon Valley’s Stupidest Investments.” He writes:

But Silicon Valley, like any other industry, has its share of truly dumb ideas. For every start-up that changes the world and makes its founders rich, a thousand die quick, anonymous deaths.

Some of tech’s clunkers never get off the ground, but others manage to get big, high-profile investments despite having no redeeming qualities whatsoever. (For example, what kind of genius decided to throw $1.2 million at NaturallyCurly, the “leading social network and community for people with wavy, curly and kinky hair?”)

Roose provides no actual evidence as to why NaturallyCurly is a bad investment. He doesn’t cite a thing – not their traffic numbers, no advertising sales, and no discussion of the exponential growth in the market they offer. But why should he? NaturallyCurly doesn’t fit the pattern – and Roose’s casual dismal underscores exactly why minorities, women of color in particular, have such a hard time breaking into the consciousness of the tech world.

In the comments, a few people went out of the way to correct Roose’s assumptions:

RACHELSKLAR
“What kind of genius decided to throw $1.2 million at NaturallyCurly, the ‘leading social network and community for people with wavy, curly and kinky hair?’” This kind: John Paul Dejoria, founder of John Paul Mitchell Systems (that’s a hair-care company) and Patron Tequila (you *may* have heard of it). Probably he saw a wildly underserved market being targeted by a company that grew steadily and organically thanks to the vision of the founding team. But why do research when you can just breezily make a call based on zero knowledge? This would be a great column if it were based on serious analysis. The casual throwaway diss on Naturally Curly is…not.

JOANIEPETERSON
@RachelSklar – Agreed. Now I know there’s not a lot of overlap between NYMag and black girls (hi bananarama), but NaturallyCurly is tapping into a HUGE market. I mean, even ya’ll white folks saw “Good Hair” right?

And, unlike companies like Carol’s Daughter that are now trying to “pivot” to gain market share beyond those with African ancestry, NaturallyCurly started out with a pan-ethnic outlook. Pretty smart: they get to keep the majority-black readership yet face little risk of being accused of “selling out” as they grow.

And the CEO of TextureMedia, Crista Bailey, noted that the market is huge (60% of the world has textured hair and 80 million women in the US alone have textured hair), that their base is strong (two million unique visitors every month) and puts the spending power of the Naturally Curly community (close to a half billion each year). A million dollar investment is about 50 cents per user.

In addition, Roose wouldn’t have had to look far to see why natural and textured hair care is a booming market. In my comment, I noted how looking at the revenues of leading natural hair companies like Ouidad (estimated $10 Million annually) and Carol’s Daughter ($35 million annually) would show that considering the fairly small investment, it made total sense. That level of investment was less than what some companies pay for their advertising campaigns.