In the Black Girls Code classroom 9 through 11-year-olds, girls listened attentively, and answered questions eagerly. With every invitation to participate, when asked to identify the logos for different web browsers or identify the image tags on a page, students shot their arms straight into the air, their bodies squirming in their chairs as they struggled to inch their hands ever skyward.
It’s that curiosity and excitement that Bryant wants to help nurture before girls reach middle and high school. Bryant hopes to host Black Girls Code trainings before the summer’s over in New York, Detroit, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and St. Louis.
“Those subliminal and outright messages that girls are not meant to do math were absolutely there throughout my educational career,” said Bryant, who’s worked for over 15 years as an electrical engineer. “I used other tools to block out that noise and keep moving forward. That’s my focus now, blocking that noise out and showing girls they can do these technical topics.”

In the Black Girls Code classroom 9 through 11-year-olds, girls listened attentively, and answered questions eagerly. With every invitation to participate, when asked to identify the logos for different web browsers or identify the image tags on a page, students shot their arms straight into the air, their bodies squirming in their chairs as they struggled to inch their hands ever skyward.

It’s that curiosity and excitement that Bryant wants to help nurture before girls reach middle and high school. Bryant hopes to host Black Girls Code trainings before the summer’s over in New York, Detroit, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and St. Louis.

“Those subliminal and outright messages that girls are not meant to do math were absolutely there throughout my educational career,” said Bryant, who’s worked for over 15 years as an electrical engineer. “I used other tools to block out that noise and keep moving forward. That’s my focus now, blocking that noise out and showing girls they can do these technical topics.”