"My family used to joke that only white people need therapy. Black people go to church instead, find remedies on their knees in prayer, sing their sorrows away. Meanwhile, white academics told me that African-Americans merely fabricated ungrounded stigma around psychiatric help. As absurd as these two viewpoints may sound, these myths actually point to a greater phenomenon.

As of 2012, 15% of the US American population without health insurance was African-American. Considering the role economic status plays in healthcare sheds light on the racial discrepancy with respect to treating mental illness. Many people with health insurance find that their companies don’t cover the cost of mental illness treatment, and those without any health insurance find themselves facing incredibly high prices to pay for medical care, or opting not to pursue treatment at all. These obstacles often lead Black folks in the states to “rely on family, religious and social communities for emotional support rather than turning to health care professionals, even though this may at times be necessary,” states NAMI’s fact sheet on African American Community Mental Health.

Even if able to pay for treatment, many Black folks encounter prejudices and biases from medical caregivers. Black people, especially Black men, are frequently misdiagnosed when it comes to mental illness. For example, most prominently in the 1960s, white doctors institutionalized Black men involved in civil rights protests (particularly in Detroit) on the grounds that the behaviors these men defended as political activism was really schizophrenic rage and volatility. Also, medical practitioners’ prescriptions sometimes reflect discriminatory and generally racial assumptions that Black people do not need as much medicine as white people. Studies conducted by the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health discovered that Black US Americans are 1.5 times as likely to be denied antidepressant treatment. No one wants tell you that the system is sick. No one wants to tell you that the healthcare system intentionally keeps historically marginalized groups like queer folks, and Black folks, and people who happen to find themselves at the intersection of queerness and Blackness sick."

To Be Queer, Black, and “Sick” | Autostraddle (via brutereason)

This is not a feel good article, but it NEEDS to be said. This is a huge problem, and part of the reason that I will never shame anyone for having self-diagnosed.

(via depressionresource)

(via autisticallythor)

metalgender:

friskk:

people who self diagnose themselves with mental illnesses and then refuse to go to an actual person who can diagnose them and refuse to seek help are actually the worst

ok bye

sorry but all i’m getting from this is “people who are poor, uninsured, discriminated against by the medical profession, or abused are actually the worst”

so yeah, bye

(via goldenheartedrose)

ucsdhealthsciences:

UC San Diego researchers have found clear and direct new evidence that autism begins during pregnancy, reporting that patches of disrupted brain development occur in the womb.

Patches of Cortical Layers Disrupted During Early Brain Development in Autism

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Allen Institute for Brain Science have published a study that gives clear and direct new evidence that autism begins during pregnancy.

The study will be published in the March 27 online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.  

The researchers – Eric Courchesne, PhD, professor of neurosciences and director of the Autism Center of Excellence at UC San Diego, Ed S. Lein, PhD, of the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, and first author Rich Stoner, PhD, of the UC San Diego Autism Center of Excellence – analyzed 25 genes in post-mortem brain tissue of children with and without autism. These included genes that serve as biomarkers for brain cell types in different layers of the cortex, genes implicated in autism and several control genes.

“Building a baby’s brain during pregnancy involves creating a cortex that contains six layers,” Courchesne said. “We discovered focal patches of disrupted development of these cortical layers in the majority of children with autism.” Stoner created the first three-dimensional model visualizing brain locations where patches of cortex had failed to develop the normal cell-layering pattern.

“The most surprising finding was the similar early developmental pathology across nearly all of the autistic brains, especially given the diversity of symptoms in patients with autism, as well as the extremely complex genetics behind the disorder,” explained Lein.

During early brain development, each cortical layer develops its own specific types of brain cells, each with specific patterns of brain connectivity that perform unique and important roles in processing information. As a brain cell develops into a specific type in a specific layer with   specific connections, it acquires a distinct genetic signature or “marker” that can be observed.

The study found that in the brains of children with autism, key genetic markers were absent in brain cells in multiple layers. “This defect,” Courchesne said, “indicates that the crucial early developmental step of creating six distinct layers with specific types of brain cells – something that begins in prenatal life – had been disrupted.”

Equally important, said the scientists, these early developmental defects were present in focal patches of cortex, suggesting the defect is not uniform throughout the cortex. The brain regions most affected by focal patches of absent gene markers were the frontal and the temporal cortex, possibly illuminating why different functional systems are impacted across individuals with the disorder.

The frontal cortex is associated with higher-order brain function, such as complex communication and comprehension of social cues. The temporal cortex is associated with language. The disruptions of frontal and temporal cortical layers seen in the study may underlie symptoms most often displayed in autistic spectrum disorders. The visual cortex – an area of the brain associated with perception that tends to be spared in autism – displayed no abnormalities. 

“The fact that we were able to find these patches is remarkable, given that the cortex is roughly the size of the surface of a basketball, and we only examined pieces of tissue the size of a pencil eraser,” said Lein. “This suggests that these abnormalities are quite pervasive across the surface of the cortex.”

Data collected for the Allen Brain Atlas, as well as the BrainSpan Atlas of the Developing Human Brain was developed by a consortium of partners and funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. It allowed scientists to identify specific genes in the developing human brain that could be used as biomarkers for the different layer cell types.

Researching the origins of autism is challenging because it typically relies upon studying adult brains and attempting to extrapolate backwards. “In this case,” Lein noted, “we were able to study autistic and control cases at a young age, giving us a unique insight into how autism presents in the developing brain.”

“The finding that these defects occur in patches rather than across the entirety of cortex gives hope as well as insight about the nature of autism,” added Courchesne.

According to the scientists, such patchy defects, as opposed to uniform cortical pathology, may help explain why many toddlers with autism show clinical improvement with early treatment and over time. The findings support the idea that in children with autism the brain can sometimes rewire connections to circumvent early focal defects, raising hope that understanding these patches may eventually open new avenues to explore how that improvement occurs.

What I wish would happen as the result of autism research: Better and more focused treatment options and services for autistic people like me.

What will probably happen instead: increased pressure on people to have eugenic abortions.

Additionally, before anyone jumps in with the wrongheaded idea that I’m again abortions for anyone who needs one: no. I’m against stigma, ableism, misinformation, and the total lack of informed consent and abuses that go on in the medical community when prenatal testing for any disability becomes available, as has occurred with Down Syndrome:

Many women are unprepared to make prenatal decisions about fetuses diagnosed with Down Syndrome because of societal pressures to have “normal” children, a negative view of persons with disabilities by many in society, a fear of legal liability by those in the medical community, the lack of genuine informed consent before undergoing genetic testing and abortion, and the failure of non-directive pre-abortion counseling in the medical community.

Moreover, medical professionals fail to communicate correct and unbiased information before and during the genetic screening, diagnostic testing, and abortion decision-making process. This article addresses the contributing factors and causes that ultimately lead to a lack of informed consent and a very high abortion rate for fetuses diagnosed with Down Syndrome.

I’m not against increasing our knowledge; it’s the LACK of information I’m against. I think information like this will be used to try and prevent autistic people from existing instead of trying to help autistic people who are alive right now, and heavily stigmatized, abused, and murdered because we’re autistic.

(via dynastylnoire)

"The proposed legislation, dubbed “The Helping Families In Mental Health Crisis Act,” would eliminate funding for cost-effective, voluntary services that are known to improve outcomes for people with mental illness, such as peer-run services and family supports, while expanding funding for coercive service models such as “assisted outpatient treatment” (AOT), which permits states to force individuals to follow a specific court-ordered treatment plan."

ASAN condemns proposal to cut funding for effective mental health advocacy and interventions, expand forced treatment programs (via disabilityhistory)

This is why people who go on and on about how self-diagnosis is somehow evil and wrong and dangerous need to SHUT UP. Because legislation like this is cutting funding for whatever affordable care options exist (not many!), AND CRIMINALIZING MENTAL ILLNESS MORE THAN IT ALREADY IS.

(via yesthattoo)

In Kansas, gay/lesbian/bisexual/pansexual etc. people can now legally be banned from

shadygrifter:

wessasaurus-rex:

gay-of-demonic-charm:

~ Shops
~ Restaurants
~ Hotels
~ Any other business
~ Their jobs
~ Their university
~ Public pools and parks
~ Everywhere under state control
~ Police services
~ Hospitals
~ And by extension that means 999 too

If they make a case to marry someone of the same gender they will not only lose but have to pay for the opposition’s lawyer

Just thought I’d let you guys know, since I can hardly believe it myself

fuck

image

According to MSNBC.com as of 4 hours ago:

Kansas House Bill 2453, aka “the official LGBT discrimination bill”,  has officially been killed in Kansas’s Senate, which means that it will not pass into law.

Instead, what it will do is be booted back to Kansas’s House in order to have revisions made. According to the current House speaker, if it went to vote again, it “probably wouldn’t pass”.

THIS IS VERY GOOD NEWS.

It is also largely in part because of the grass roots petitions on facebook and online, showing lawmakers that citizens are highly opposed to this kind of bill passing.

So everyone?

Good job. We’re good for now.

(via pixieorsomething)

[ableism]

octopusice:

youneedacat:

releasewhatdoesnotserveyou:

littleteapotsie:

ballerina-duck:

How Ableism Creates the Idea of “Special” Needs, and Why It’s Harmful

fatbodypolitics:

girljanitor:

sylviasybil:

girljanitor:

I’m a disabled person, and I also work at the Disability Services Office at a college.

Not very long ago, a professor rushed into our office flustered and angry because

1. She had a blind student in her class.

2. She asked us how we planned to communicate graded papers to her student, since her habit was to write corrections on printed papers.

3. To which we replied, “Just send her an email instead of writing your corrections on the printed paper.”

Her response?

How DARE we burden HER with so much extra work? More about how busy she is. More about how that gives an “unfair advantage”. (???) More on how could we possibly expect her to make such a drastic accommodation, which wasn’t fair to her or her other students.

Our response:

How many emails do you think you send to your sighted students every semester? Dozens? Hundreds? How many classes of 25+ students do your teach every semester? How do you communicate with them?

Email.

Email.

This problem was entirely created in this professor’s mind by her own assumption that anything a disabled student could need was unacceptable, and a waste of her time.She returned to our office to complain several times over this.

She threw an actual tantrum over something she did for her non-disabled students every single day without even considering it.

Because “everyone knows” disabled people, whatever we might need, that need is too much. It’s a burden on abled people. It’s “unfair to everyone else (read: non-disabled people).

Many disability activists say things along the lines of “our needs aren’t more, just different”. Well, I have to say that even when are needs are the same, they’re still, apparently “too much”.

Year and a half ago I had a class with this professor I’ll call Dr. Smith. The student who sat next to me, who I’ll call Abby, used a wheelchair. (Not entirely a coincidence - I always sit in the front row so I can hear the professor and she had to sit in the front row because the room had auditorium seating.)

The two of us came to be pretty friendly with each other and I got to hear all the horror stories she had about Dr. Smith refusing her accommodations. Things like, on exam day she passed out papers to everyone including Abby. The rest of us start writing, Abby calls Dr. Smith over and reminds her that she can’t use a pencil, she has to take exams on the computer.

First Dr. Smith was like, “You have to tell me these things ahead of time.” After Abby reminded her that the disabilities office had emailed her before the class started and Abby confirmed her receipt of the email on the first day of class, the professor switched to, “You have to remind of these things the day before.” Abby said the professor should have told her that on the first day when they were discussing Abby’s needs. Then Dr. Smith was like, “Anyway it’s not on the computer now, I’ll put it on there later today and you can take it at home tomorrow.”

So everything’s worked out all hunky-dory. Except we get our exams back and Abby’s been docked late points. So the disabilities office gets involved. And Dr. Smith’s excuse changes, now they’re not late points, now she retroactively graded it harder because Abby wasn’t supervised and might have used her textbook. This disabilities office was like, “We told you we proctor computer exams here, there was no reason to have Abby take it at home.” The professor says, Abby agreed! Abby says, I wasn’t given any other options!

Last I heard from Abby she was dropping out one class shy of her bachelor’s because complications due to ableism meant she couldn’t afford tuition.

Next semester I have another class with Dr. Smith. Next semester is also the first semester I’ll have officially registered with the disabilities office and utilizing official accommodations. Depression and anxiety are illnesses people are often accused of faking, that I’ve been accused of “psyching myself out”. And I have trouble getting accommodations for my Autism because I fake being allistic so well people can’t see how hard it is for me to do that.

So my invisible disabilities and I are definitively looking forward to cooperation from the professor who refused accommodations to the student in the wheelchair. </sarcasm>

JFC.

I just….

wow. That is a fucking disgrace.

Also: this is really important to demonstrate that people with visible and/or physical disabilities do not “have it easier” and it’s NOT a case of “everyone just understands”.

There’s a woman at my college who uses a wheelchair, and she’s had to campaign pretty vocally about having the buttons that open the flipping DOORS working properly! (I spoke with her on a disabled women’s history month panel and I admire her style).

This makes me so angry. 

LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT MY ASSHOLE SPANISH TEACHER.

I can’t remember exactly how it started, I think it was that he wouldn’t let me make up a test I’d missed since I was out sick.  I went to my counselor and asked her for advice, and it turned out she had to email him because not accommodating someone with a 504 plan is, yanno, breaking the law.

Anyhoo, I notice a few weeks later that three homework assignments I did (late) aren’t in the online gradebook thingie.  I love the online gradebook thingie.  So I wait, because maybe he’s just busy.  After about a week, one of them finally goes in, and my grade goes from a D to a C.  Hooray!  Except for the part where I’m trying to maintain a 3.8 GPA.  So he doesn’t put the other two assignments in, even after I email him.  I talked to him in class, and it turned out he hadn’t even looked at the email.  I figured okay, I’ll give him a little while now that he’s looked at the email to grade the other two assignments.  He doesn’t do it, so I go to my counselor and she emails him.  The next day, she pulls me out of my sixth period class and says that he emailed back all but saying he wasn’t grading those because he wanted to punish me for not going to class.  So then she had to get the principal involved.  Turns out my Spanish teacher never actually read my 504 plan in the first place.  The 504 plan, mind you, that specifically states I can turn in work late because I am sick all the time, not just the days I stay home from school.  So finally, he puts in one of the assignments, an essay.  But he still hasn’t put in the other one, which was some routine homework that we’re supposed to turn in online.  I was really sick the weekend it was due, so I turned it in late.  But finally my counselor gets him to put it in, and my grade goes up to a C+ because I’m totally failing a lot of the tests since he doesn’t tell us when they are until the day before and I’m quite frequently gone then.  But hey, I have a presentation to do and some new homework, it should go up to a B- by the end of the semester!

Then he marks the presentation as missing.  I’m back to a C-.

Oh, the tales I could tell you about my experience with ableist teachers and professors. I think high school was the worst because even some of my favorite teachers learning-wise were still really stinking shitty with handling me being disabled. There was one teacher who kicked me out of a class because he couldn’t handle me being sick. Another teacher was so jumpy around me, I nicknamed him “twitch” because every time I so much as reached for my water he’d jump and demand if I was okay. Another teacher told me I needed to see a psychologist. Quite a few of them told me I was up to date with homework and tests only to tell me two weeks before the final grades were inputed that I was missing half my assignments and if I didn’t turn them in, I’d fail the class. I was literally told I didn’t even have go to school for three classes and I’d still graduate, only to be told a week before finals that I needed to drop two classes because if I didn’t I wouldn’t be able to pass. No one ever told me when I was falling behind or warned me that I was in danger of failing the class, even when they were assuring me I was keeping up with the class and my grades were all above a B-. 

A friend and I were both (in totally different schools, but at about the same age) kicked out of class by teachers who accused us of being on drugs, with no basis whatsoever (and we weren’t on drugs, and had never done drugs).  Mostly because we were autistic and doing weird things — in my case when he kept changing the schedule on me I backed up against the wall and had a full-blown panic attack and then couldn’t do the test that he’d promised would be on a different day.  He publicly accused me of drug abuse, then privately told me I was ‘too immature’ to be there, and threw me out of his class.  His treatment of me did nothing to help my bullying by other students at that school.

And don’t get me started on the environmental studies professor at community college who didn’t want to accommodate me on anything.  Not my trouble with fluorescent lights (which she had a personal beef with because fluorescent lights were more energy-friendly).  Not my inability to understand a damn thing during group work because a class of over a hundred people were all talking at once and I couldn’t hear, so I kept either interrupting people or talking over them or not talking at all and couldn’t hear what anyone said and therefore didn’t get along with anyone in my group at all no matter who was in it.  It took a protracted argument with my disability counselor to get her to allow me to do group work in a separate room.  And group work still wasn’t easy, but at least I could hear what people were saying.

Then there was when I tried to go to university — a completely failed experiment overall.  But the disability office wouldn’t help me at all because they told us at the outset that only people with cognitive disabilities that had to do with basic stuff that required note-takers and stuff were to be accommodated.  If our cognitive disabilities involved self-care, organizational skills, or anything else at all, we weren’t accommodated because “you’re adults now and have to learn that stuff on your own”.  This included a woman with schizophrenia whose only accommodation was that she needed someone around to ask whether voices she heard in class were real or not.  I had severe problems with organization and self-care and was repeatedly told I didn’t belong on a university campus.  (Which turned out to be true, but not for those reasons.)  The autism center on campus was a complete joke.  They’d help with social skills problems but they didn’t give a crap that I was starving and couldn’t take care of myself on even a minimal level.  They also didn’t understand sensory issues and believed that meltdowns are manipulative behavior to get out of having to do things. I found that out later in a book written by the “expert” who ran the center.  That was my first direct experience where I learned that autism “experts” don’t necessarily know shit about really basic things about the autistic experience.  It scares me that people look up to them for information about autism and disregard what autistic people say about ourselves because we’re not educated enough.

I’m thankful that I haven’t had any problems nearly so bad as some of the people above me, but of the three semesters I’ve been at college, I’ve had to drop a total of four classes. Two of those were because I over-loaded myself and went through some really bad emotional shit and just couldn’t handle my physical and mental health and a 15 credit work load. Two of those, however, were because I had teachers that refused to work with me. I had a math teacher who pretty much told me I was on my own for the class. I had missed a few classes and went to after hours to ask him to explain a few concepts that I was not getting (as evidence by failing a quiz on my part). He point blank told me he wasn’t there to reteach the entire class periods to me and that he wasn’t going to make exceptions for me. The other teacher was one who told me I couldn’t make up in class quizzes because they were in a clicker format (you get a few seconds to click the button of the correct answer). I was going to fail her class, when I got an A on the midterm, because she wouldn’t let me make them up WHICH IS A PART OF MY ACCOMMODATIONS.

Over-all my college’s ODS is really quite good though, or at least they are from my experience. It’s just teachers that suck.

I keep reblogging and boosting these stories because everyone has them. And that’s when you start to see the big picture, which is systematic discrimination in the form in individuals creating barriers, shaming those who dare to ask for help, and just plain not helping.

releasewhatdoesnotserveyou:

littleteapotsie:

ballerina-duck:

How Ableism Creates the Idea of “Special” Needs, and Why It’s Harmful

fatbodypolitics:

girljanitor:

sylviasybil:

girljanitor:

I’m a disabled person, and I also work at the Disability Services Office at a college.

Not very long ago, a professor rushed into our office flustered and angry because

1. She had a blind student in her class.

2. She asked us how we planned to communicate graded papers to her student, since her habit was to write corrections on printed papers.

3. To which we replied, “Just send her an email instead of writing your corrections on the printed paper.”

Her response?

How DARE we burden HER with so much extra work? More about how busy she is. More about how that gives an “unfair advantage”. (???) More on how could we possibly expect her to make such a drastic accommodation, which wasn’t fair to her or her other students.

Our response:

How many emails do you think you send to your sighted students every semester? Dozens? Hundreds? How many classes of 25+ students do your teach every semester? How do you communicate with them?

Email.

Email.

This problem was entirely created in this professor’s mind by her own assumption that anything a disabled student could need was unacceptable, and a waste of her time.She returned to our office to complain several times over this.

She threw an actual tantrum over something she did for her non-disabled students every single day without even considering it.

Because “everyone knows” disabled people, whatever we might need, that need is too much. It’s a burden on abled people. It’s “unfair to everyone else (read: non-disabled people).

Many disability activists say things along the lines of “our needs aren’t more, just different”. Well, I have to say that even when are needs are the same, they’re still, apparently “too much”.

Year and a half ago I had a class with this professor I’ll call Dr. Smith. The student who sat next to me, who I’ll call Abby, used a wheelchair. (Not entirely a coincidence - I always sit in the front row so I can hear the professor and she had to sit in the front row because the room had auditorium seating.)

The two of us came to be pretty friendly with each other and I got to hear all the horror stories she had about Dr. Smith refusing her accommodations. Things like, on exam day she passed out papers to everyone including Abby. The rest of us start writing, Abby calls Dr. Smith over and reminds her that she can’t use a pencil, she has to take exams on the computer.

First Dr. Smith was like, “You have to tell me these things ahead of time.” After Abby reminded her that the disabilities office had emailed her before the class started and Abby confirmed her receipt of the email on the first day of class, the professor switched to, “You have to remind of these things the day before.” Abby said the professor should have told her that on the first day when they were discussing Abby’s needs. Then Dr. Smith was like, “Anyway it’s not on the computer now, I’ll put it on there later today and you can take it at home tomorrow.”

So everything’s worked out all hunky-dory. Except we get our exams back and Abby’s been docked late points. So the disabilities office gets involved. And Dr. Smith’s excuse changes, now they’re not late points, now she retroactively graded it harder because Abby wasn’t supervised and might have used her textbook. This disabilities office was like, “We told you we proctor computer exams here, there was no reason to have Abby take it at home.” The professor says, Abby agreed! Abby says, I wasn’t given any other options!

Last I heard from Abby she was dropping out one class shy of her bachelor’s because complications due to ableism meant she couldn’t afford tuition.

Next semester I have another class with Dr. Smith. Next semester is also the first semester I’ll have officially registered with the disabilities office and utilizing official accommodations. Depression and anxiety are illnesses people are often accused of faking, that I’ve been accused of “psyching myself out”. And I have trouble getting accommodations for my Autism because I fake being allistic so well people can’t see how hard it is for me to do that.

So my invisible disabilities and I are definitively looking forward to cooperation from the professor who refused accommodations to the student in the wheelchair. </sarcasm>

JFC.

I just….

wow. That is a fucking disgrace.

Also: this is really important to demonstrate that people with visible and/or physical disabilities do not “have it easier” and it’s NOT a case of “everyone just understands”.

There’s a woman at my college who uses a wheelchair, and she’s had to campaign pretty vocally about having the buttons that open the flipping DOORS working properly! (I spoke with her on a disabled women’s history month panel and I admire her style).

This makes me so angry. 

LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT MY ASSHOLE SPANISH TEACHER.

I can’t remember exactly how it started, I think it was that he wouldn’t let me make up a test I’d missed since I was out sick.  I went to my counselor and asked her for advice, and it turned out she had to email him because not accommodating someone with a 504 plan is, yanno, breaking the law.

Anyhoo, I notice a few weeks later that three homework assignments I did (late) aren’t in the online gradebook thingie.  I love the online gradebook thingie.  So I wait, because maybe he’s just busy.  After about a week, one of them finally goes in, and my grade goes from a D to a C.  Hooray!  Except for the part where I’m trying to maintain a 3.8 GPA.  So he doesn’t put the other two assignments in, even after I email him.  I talked to him in class, and it turned out he hadn’t even looked at the email.  I figured okay, I’ll give him a little while now that he’s looked at the email to grade the other two assignments.  He doesn’t do it, so I go to my counselor and she emails him.  The next day, she pulls me out of my sixth period class and says that he emailed back all but saying he wasn’t grading those because he wanted to punish me for not going to class.  So then she had to get the principal involved.  Turns out my Spanish teacher never actually read my 504 plan in the first place.  The 504 plan, mind you, that specifically states I can turn in work late because I am sick all the time, not just the days I stay home from school.  So finally, he puts in one of the assignments, an essay.  But he still hasn’t put in the other one, which was some routine homework that we’re supposed to turn in online.  I was really sick the weekend it was due, so I turned it in late.  But finally my counselor gets him to put it in, and my grade goes up to a C+ because I’m totally failing a lot of the tests since he doesn’t tell us when they are until the day before and I’m quite frequently gone then.  But hey, I have a presentation to do and some new homework, it should go up to a B- by the end of the semester!

Then he marks the presentation as missing.  I’m back to a C-.

Oh, the tales I could tell you about my experience with ableist teachers and professors. I think high school was the worst because even some of my favorite teachers learning-wise were still really stinking shitty with handling me being disabled. There was one teacher who kicked me out of a class because he couldn’t handle me being sick. Another teacher was so jumpy around me, I nicknamed him “twitch” because every time I so much as reached for my water he’d jump and demand if I was okay. Another teacher told me I needed to see a psychologist. Quite a few of them told me I was up to date with homework and tests only to tell me two weeks before the final grades were inputed that I was missing half my assignments and if I didn’t turn them in, I’d fail the class. I was literally told I didn’t even have go to school for three classes and I’d still graduate, only to be told a week before finals that I needed to drop two classes because if I didn’t I wouldn’t be able to pass. No one ever told me when I was falling behind or warned me that I was in danger of failing the class, even when they were assuring me I was keeping up with the class and my grades were all above a B-. 

mselise:

madgastronomer:

mselise:

girljanitor:

sylviasybil:

girljanitor:

I’m a disabled person, and I also work at the Disability Services Office at a college.

Not very long ago, a professor rushed into our office flustered and angry because

1. She had a blind student in her class.

2. She asked us how we

CN: ableism, mental illness, depression

At my grad school they had literally one wheelchair ramp that was apparently meant to grant access to all the classrooms in the building. One. If you had classes on opposite sides of the building and needed a ramp, you had to go out, around, and around again to reach the classroom (because the building is old and was built split-level). Many of our classes were only 10 minutes apart, and several professors locked the door after the start time.

It’s not really a surprise there was only one grad student who needed the ramp there.

Then there’s the whole thing of students with mental illnesses being required to report the status of their treatment (if they were getting treated) and having their THERAPISTS and PSYCHIATRISTS forced to report their diagnoses, prescriptions, and treatment status, too. So many students there went untreated for very severe problems (I never reported my major depression, for instance). Because, of course, mental illnesses are DANGEROUS and make you incapable of being a competent professional or telling the truth.

Erm, when was that? Because that, especially the forced disclosure, sounds very much like a violation of the ADA to me.

I just graduated this August.

And yes, the forced disclosure is an ADA violation, as well as a massive violation of doctor-patient privilege and HIPAA. They get around it by saying it’s for the good of the “profession.” And litigating it would, of course, require someone to end up with their future ruined by these rules, which no one is willing to do (for obvious reasons). But you can get around the rules, if you can afford it - eschew the free on-campus help (who follow the reporting rules) and go somewhere off-campus, where they actually follow doctor-patient rules and HIPAA (and when I told them about the rules, flat-out told me they wouldn’t comply unless I directly ordered them to). Assuming you can afford it. I could for a semester, so I was able to get some help, but eventually I was left to deal with my depression alone.

I’m just now becoming human again after grad school - I can’t believe I lived with the rules and restrictions, with the jerk classmates and staff that couldn’t care at all about my needs and future. Okay, I lie. Two professors actually cared about me. I did papers with them.

Holy. Shit.

Someone seriously should out the name of this school if possible, because I just….cannot fathom….forced disclosure. That’s absolutely repulsive.

I have no doubt they’re getting away with it, because you’re right about litigation generally requiring someone to go under the bus. Not only that, some states have been gutting their non-discrimination laws in recent years, which is undermining a lot of attempts to get some goddamn accountability or change anywhere in the education system.

At the very least, hopefully someone could give the name of the school so those receiving treatment might be able to avoid the school?

(Source: dqueerafricans, via thebigblackwolfe)

fuckyeahcracker:

Saudi student is literally surrounded by FBI for cooking rice under terrorist suspicions 
White people literally can not associate positive words with Black faces because of racism 
More white people use drugs but Black people are sent to jail for drugs at 10 times the rate that white people are 
Black people who “sound Black” earn less money than those who don’t because of associations with stereotypes. Black people who “sound Black” are less likely to get called back for jobs 
Black children grow up literally associating being Black with being bad and ugly 
White people when tested shot more unarmed Black subjects than armed and unarmed white subjects 
Hate crimes increase after Boston tragedy 
Moroccan High School Student is linked to Boston tragedy for being Brown 
Bangladeshi man is beaten by people out of racism 
NYPD Commissioner wants Black and Latino men to fear him after the police targeted literally 90 percent Black and Latino men in New York and humiliating them by frisking them in public under the assumption that they had weapons. Studies found that white men were the ones who overwhelmingly had weapons while Black and Latino men didn’t 
White people blaming and convicting Black men for crimes they never committed and everyone believing them because of racism 
Stop and Frisk, ruled unconstitutional was practiced by New York police disproportionately and unfairly affecting 90% Black and Latino men because of racism 
Universities throwing racist ‘Fiesta Party’ homogenizing culture with extreme racism 
Here are some of the numbers on hate crimes against People of Color and btw, Neo Naziism is increasing! 
Every 28 Hours an African American is Extrajudicially Murdered in the U.S. 
Black people 3 times more likely to be arrested for Marijuana 
Black people receive much harsher sentencing than white people for the same crimes
Deaf Black man is stabbed out of racism when his sign language is mistaken for a GANG SIGN 
Anti-Islam posters run free on the train to reinforce racism anti-Islamic sentiments and Islamaphobia 
Oops! Chicago police raids the wrong house, holds an 11 month old at gunpoint to raise their hand, kills their dog all because of racism and assuming it was a crackhouse! Oopsies 
Let’s take it overseas! Black people in England and Wales are 7 times more likely to be stopped by police than white people. Asian people are twice as likely 
People assuming Native american baby names are actually Native and have any meaning to any ethnic group when they don’t 
Here’s a whole collection of people saying racist stereotyping homogenizing disgusting stuff about Natives 
People protesting (Idle No More) defending Native people’s humanity are attacked with violence 
White kids think it’s totally okay and normal to photograph themselves lynching a Black baby doll like an effigy
Member of the most glorified band in the world Paul McCartney made a racist white supremacist song called ‘No Pakistanis’ and everyone still glorifies him as a good person 
Racism in actual political campaign in Massachusetts against a Native runner portraying her name and image in a racist stereotypical inappropriate manner
Indian Sikh school students protest for students who are banned from wearing their turbans in public schools in France 
Here’s a graph of the statistic that approx every 28 hours an African American is extrajudicially executed in the US 
NYPD profiling and targeting LGBT*Q People of Color 
Black students (especially boys and children with disabilities) face more and harsher punishments in public schools and are being pushed out of schools into the criminal justice system. 
Black male incarceration has jumped 500% from 1986 to 2004
 Albany police: SWAT literally uses a poor Black neighborhood to train in because they say it’s ‘realistic’ 
The audio recording from a young man of color of a NYPD stop and frisking him based solely how he looks calling him a “FUCKING MUTT” 
Incarceration rates by ethnicity 
All of this fucking cultural appropriation

NYPD Data Proves White People Are More Likely To Possess Drugs Or A Weapon Than Racial Minorities When Stopped, Yet 84% of Stop &amp; Frisk Victims Are Black/Latino

Residential Segregation




I mean I’m pretty sure it’s racism, why?

fuckyeahcracker:

I mean I’m pretty sure it’s racism, why?

(Source: fyeahcracker, via moniquill)