snarkbender:

maghrabiyya:

ok after i reblogged that last post i had to go download some of Jolipunk's photography to post on my blog

i love the ‘Fucking Tourists!’ series with. a. passion.

here for this

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

kateordie:

shonnia21:

Michelle Rodriguez

- [Laurent Levy]

Bless you, all of you

(via heartinamitten)

queennubian:

thepoetspace:

Crowned King like Simba

you know what…

(via dynastylnoire)

(Source: fatart, via dynastylnoire)

heytoyourmamanem:

"Zumigo" 
Photograph by Chas. Eisenmann, New York (ca. 1880)

heytoyourmamanem:

"Zumigo" 

Photograph by Chas. Eisenmann, New York (ca. 1880)

(via dynastylnoire)

maximushka:

© Maxim Vakhovskiy

maximushka:

© Maxim Vakhovskiy

vintageblackglamour:

Maya Angelou doing a little reading in her dressing room before her performance at the Village Vanguard in New York City. Long before she was a poet and writer and the icon we know today, Dr. Angelou was a dancer and singer of folk and calypso songs (she even recorded an album in 1957 called “Miss Calypso” and appeared in the film “Calypso Heat Wave” that same year. This photo was taken by G. Marshall Wilson, who was a staff photographer at Ebony for 33 years. Photo: Art.com

vintageblackglamour:

Maya Angelou doing a little reading in her dressing room before her performance at the Village Vanguard in New York City. Long before she was a poet and writer and the icon we know today, Dr. Angelou was a dancer and singer of folk and calypso songs (she even recorded an album in 1957 called “Miss Calypso” and appeared in the film “Calypso Heat Wave” that same year. This photo was taken by G. Marshall Wilson, who was a staff photographer at Ebony for 33 years. Photo: Art.com

(via badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

(Source: jergilberts, via so-treu)

devoutfashion:

Noelani Jaunay by Chris Fatseas

(via whatabootsecondbreakfast)

sydneyflapper:

wonderfinch:

unhistorical:

Victorian-era portraits of African-Americans, 1899 or 1900; from a collection assembled by W.E.B. Du Bois for the Exposition Nègres d’Amerique of the1900 Exposition Universelle. 

Library of Congress

Fuck everyone who says black people look wrong in period clothing or would not have had access to this sort of clothing. Just seriously fuck you.

William Edward Burghardt “W. E. B.” Du Bois is a fascinating and inspiring figure, an uncompromising civil rights activist (literally uncompromising - he rejected Booker T Washington’s Atlanta Compromise, an unwritten deal struck with Southern leaders in the aftermath of the Reconstruction era, in which African-Americans would submit to.discrimination, segregation, lack of voting rights and non-unionized employment and in return Southern whites would “permit” blacks to receive a basic education, some economic opportunities, and justice within the legal system; Du Bois called for nothing less than full equal rights.)

Du Bois and Booker T Washington, who together organised the Exposition Nègres d’Amerique, worked with Washington’s friend Frances Benjamin Johnston (a pioneering female photographer and photojournalist) to take photos of students at the Hampton Institute. The photographs were specifically compiled to counter stereotypes and the predominant white narrative about African-Americans, showcasing their success and diversity. The exhibition won several awards.

(via gardeniasandgoldchains)